Peer Review Week

Peer Review Week is an international multi-sector initiative to promote understanding of peer review and celebrate the central role it plays in research.

Peer Review Week was started in 2015 by Sense About Science, PRE (Peer Review Evaluation)ORCID, ScienceOpen and Wiley-Blackwell to highlight the importance of peer review in academic communications. This initiative gained momentum from the efforts of the academic community to get the contributions of peer reviewers meaningfully recognized. The first academic efforts took the shape of an open letter from early career researchers in the UK to the Higher Education Funding Council for England in July 2012, and another open letter from Australian academics to the Australian Research Council two years later.

Peer Review Week has grown since its first inception, and we are delighted to work alongside close to 30 leading science publishers and science communicators in this global initiative to share the great value of peer review. This close collaborative network allows us to share the powerful message that good peer review, whatever shape or form it might take, is critical to academic communications.

Find out more about our activities for Peer Review Week 2018 and Peer Review Week 2017

Featured article

A protocol for multiple genetic modifications in S. cerevisiae using CRISPR/Cas9

Two methods are described for efficient genetic modification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using CRISPR/Cas9. The first method enables the modification of a single genetic locus using in vivo assembly of a guide RNA (gRNA) expression plasmid without the need for prior cloning. A second method using in vitro assembled plasmids that could contain up to two gRNAs was used to simultaneously introduce up to six genetic modifications (e.g. six gene deletions) in a single transformation step by transforming up to three gRNA expression plasmids simultaneously. The method is not only suitable for gene deletion but is also applicable for in vivo site-directed mutagenesis and integration of multiple DNA fragments in a single locus.

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