Volunteers

We are proud to work collectively with a growing community of microbiologists whose voluntary contributions are helping to put microbiology firmly on the map. We thank and acknowledge the following volunteers for the great work they have done so far in 2016-2018 in support of various business and science communication projects:

The ALAM Translation Project

A team with the aim of translating abstracts into Spanish and Portuguese for a collection of recent, influential articles published by Latin American authors in our five journals to strengthen collaboration with ALAM (Asociación Latinoamericana de Microbiología a.k.a. Latin American Association of Microbiology) to create cross-continent synergies ahead of the upcoming ALAM Congress (Santiago de Chile, 13-16 Nov. 2018).

Journal Social Media Editors

A team with the aim of keeping our community up to date about the latest articles and collections from the FEMS Journals

Opportunities Board

Opportunities board team consists of three different taskforce: Events, Jobs, and fighting AMR. They have the aim to search and collect opportunities benificial for the microbiological community and collate them on our Opportunities Board.

OneHealth Campaign

One Health is an innovative global-wide approach that aims to tighten the collaboration and communication in all aspects of human, animal and environmental healthcare into one synergistic body: One Health. The goal is to better understand and overcome current and future issues in all areas of healthcare. By doing so, this will advance research strategies and improve our scientific understanding of the complex mechanisms affecting the environment, human and animal health.

Mapping Microbiology

The mapping project aims to bring visibility to the microbiology landscape as a whole, and show the parties involved and the extent/ impact to which they are active.

Featured article

A protocol for multiple genetic modifications in S. cerevisiae using CRISPR/Cas9

Two methods are described for efficient genetic modification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using CRISPR/Cas9. The first method enables the modification of a single genetic locus using in vivo assembly of a guide RNA (gRNA) expression plasmid without the need for prior cloning. A second method using in vitro assembled plasmids that could contain up to two gRNAs was used to simultaneously introduce up to six genetic modifications (e.g. six gene deletions) in a single transformation step by transforming up to three gRNA expression plasmids simultaneously. The method is not only suitable for gene deletion but is also applicable for in vivo site-directed mutagenesis and integration of multiple DNA fragments in a single locus.

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