Volunteer: Christina Pavloudi

Christina Pavloudi was born in Thessaloniki, Greece. She studied Biology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and then moved to Crete for her Master studies. Her PhD was an international cooperation between the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (HCMR), the University of Bremen and Ghent University. Currently she is Post Doc Researcher in the Institute of Marine Biology, Biotechnology and Aquaculture

(IMBBC) of HCMR. Her research focuses on microbial community functioning of hypoxic ecosystems, such as lagoons and oxygen minimum zones. In particular, she is interested in microbes involved in the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and sulfur. Her research interests include Microbial Ecology, Marine Biology and Ecology, Marine Biodiversity, Functional Diversity and Bioinformatics. She has been involved in 10 research and education projects, including FP7 European projects, EU COST Actions (ES1003 and ES1103) and ASSEMBLE projects.

She has published 25 peer-reviewed scientific articles and participated in international conferences and workshops.

LinkedIn: https://gr.linkedin.com/in/christinapavloudi
Website: http://www.imbbc.hcmr.gr/users/christina-pavloudi

Featured Issue

Anaerobic Biological Dehalogenation

FEMS Microbiology Ecology is proud to present this latest thematic issue on Anaerobic Biological Dehalogenation. Knowledge on anaerobic microbial dehalogenation has advanced significantly since its first discovery. Understanding of the biochemistry, physiology and ecology of organohalide-respiring bacteria (OHRB) has allowed development of bioremediation technologies for clean-up of contaminated sites. At the same time, a fundamental understanding of the processes, enzymes and organisms involved has allowed to discover new exciting features in biochemistry and microbiology. OHRB are either members of novel bacterial genera or already known ones with other metabolic features indicating the importance of horizontal gene transfer in this anaerobic respiration process. Reductive dehalogenases, thus far discovered, are all corrinoid-containing enzymes revealing unexpected biochemical features of this cofactor normally known to be involved in alkyl-transfer reactions. This special thematic issue shows nicely that there remains still a lot to be discovered regarding anaerobic biological dehalogenation.

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