Peer Review

Peer review is the most important quality check that exists in science. It is a community effort to expertly evaluate new research and ensure that it is valid, credible and of the highest possible standard. It brings together the scientific community to improve the body of knowledge for the benefit of researchers, policy makers, business, education and the public.

With the rising interest in peer review in the academic research and publishing community, it’s important to recognize the value of peer review in the growth of global knowledge and for society at large.

Peer review | Imagine a world with no peer review | Our activities | Get involved!

Imagine a world with no peer review

Without peer review, what quality control would there be for academic research?

It’s abundantly clear that we need a reliable filter of quality and validity for academic research and communications.

Peer review is not a perfect process.  On the one hand it is seen as a valuable asset to the academic community by improving the quality of published research; on the other it is seen as a growing burden on the very community it serves.

Yet despite its flaws, there is no substitute for peer review. We recognize the issues in peer review, but we believe that there is a great deal of good in the current peer review system, which is worth preserving and improving upon for the benefit of everyone.

We want to properly recognize the fundamental role that peer review plays in the academic research and publishing landscape. By bringing together researchers, campaigners and thought leaders in peer review to join the dialogue, we can better understand how to effect real change in how it is delivered for the benefit of society.

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Our activities

 

Get involved!

What does peer review mean to you? We want to hear from you.

  • Share a photo of yourself in ‘peer review mode’ with a short caption about what peer review means to you on Twitter or Facebook using the hashtag #wepeerreview.
  • Become a guest writer on our Peer review – reviewed series and share what peer review means to you to the wider microbiology community. Please email us if you are interested.
  • Keep up-to-date with our campaign activities and news by registering for a free FEMS account.
  • Do you have some ideas of your own on how to make peer review count? Fill in our volunteering interest form and tell us how you want to get involved.

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Featured article

Microbiomes inhabiting rice roots and rhizosphere

Land plants directly contact soil through their roots. An enormous diversity of microbes dwelling in root-associated zones, including endosphere (inside root), rhizoplane (root surface) and rhizosphere (soil surrounding the root surface), play essential roles in ecosystem functioning and plant health. Rice is a staple food that feeds over 50% of the global population. This mini-review summarizes the current understanding of microbial diversity of rice root-associated compartments to some extent, especially the rhizosphere, and makes a comparison of rhizosphere microbial community structures between rice and other crops/plants. Moreover, this paper describes the interactions between root-related microbiomes and rice plants, and further discusses the key factors shaping the rice root-related microbiomes.

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