Meeting Attendance Grants

Members of FEMS Member Societies can apply for our grants. Meeting Attendance Grants enable early career researchers to attend microbiology meetings worldwide to network, collaborate and keep abreast of new developments in their field. Support is limited to a maximum of € 750.

Eligibility

Applicants should be active microbiologists, having obtained their highest degree less than five years prior to the application deadline date or be a PhD student*. They should be a member of a FEMS Member Society and a presenting author (oral or poster) at the meeting. Applications to attend FEMS-sponsored meetings will not be considered as applications for support to attend these meetings should be made directly to the meeting organizer.

*periods of maternity/paternity leave, special leave or illness do not count toward this definition

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Grant Application

Complete applications should be submitted on or before the deadlines:

  • 1 March 23:59 CET for meetings that will be held within a year from the following 1 May
  • 1 September 23:59 CET for meetings that will be held within a year from the following 1 November

How to apply

You can apply via our Grants submission system (open from 1 January 2022). In order to apply, you need a FEMS profile/account.

  1. Please create an account here or login with your credentials here.
  2. Once logged in to your FEMS profile, you can access the application forms for our Grants via this link.

You can also find the application forms at any time within your FEMS profile/account:

  • login to your FEMS profile
  • then under ‘Announcements’ click on the ‘Apply for a FEMS Grant’
  • select the grant you wish to apply for
  • fill in the form, save your progress and come back to it and once you are ready – Submit
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Yeast Pathogenesis and Drug Resistance: the Beauty of the bYeast

FEMS Yeast Research is proud to present this latest thematic issue on yeast pathogenesis and drug resistance. In the past few decades, genetics and genomics studies have uncovered traits underlying the pathogenicity and drug resistances of pathogenic yeast. However, we still have a lot to uncover about the complex mechanisms used by different species to thrive in the human host, and much to do to convert this knowledge into improved clinical treatments. This thematic issue highlights the importance of the diversity of genome-scale approaches to unravel the intricate nature of pathogenesis and drug resistance in pathogenic yeasts, bringing together  a diverse range of fascinating views on antifungal drug resistance.

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