Research and Training Grants

Members of FEMS Member Societies can apply for our grants. Research and Training Grants assist early career scientists in pursuing research and training at a European host institution in a country other than their own country of residence (and exceptionally to support research and training projects outside Europe). These grants may be used to contribute to travel, accommodation and subsistence costs of making the visit. Support is limited to a maximum of €4000.

Applicants

Applicants should be active microbiologists, having obtained their highest degree less than five years prior to the application deadline date or be a PhD student. They should be a member of a FEMS Member Society. You can find a detailed overview of the requirements for this grant in the FEMS Grants Regulations.

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Grant Application

Complete applications should be submitted on or before:

  • 1 January for projects that will start within a year from the following 1 March
  • 1 July for projects that will start within a year from the following 1 September

You can apply for the upcoming round of Research and Training Grants via our Grants Online submission system.

 

The FEMS Journals Grants will award an additional € 5,000 to € 10,000 in funding to support and stimulate the professional development of early career scientists. This additional funding would not have been possible without FEMS Journals editors kindly waiving their annual remuneration fee for handling journal manuscripts. This additional funding will feed directly into the summer round of the FEMS Research and Training Grants and we are grateful to our editors for making this additional funding available.

Featured article

Microbiomes inhabiting rice roots and rhizosphere

Land plants directly contact soil through their roots. An enormous diversity of microbes dwelling in root-associated zones, including endosphere (inside root), rhizoplane (root surface) and rhizosphere (soil surrounding the root surface), play essential roles in ecosystem functioning and plant health. Rice is a staple food that feeds over 50% of the global population. This mini-review summarizes the current understanding of microbial diversity of rice root-associated compartments to some extent, especially the rhizosphere, and makes a comparison of rhizosphere microbial community structures between rice and other crops/plants. Moreover, this paper describes the interactions between root-related microbiomes and rice plants, and further discusses the key factors shaping the rice root-related microbiomes.

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