Network and activities

We are made up of an active and diverse network of around 30,000 professionals who are committed to advancing microbiology for the benefit of society in the areas of health, energy, food, materials, and the environment.  Set up in 1974, today we are a growing coalition of 54 Member Societies from 38 countries. Around half of those in our network are early career researchers, and others are business partners, scientists or campaigners.

We nurture this network with a variety of knowledge development and network-building activities:

  • We publish five highly regarded journals – Articles from our journals are downloaded over 2.5 million times annually (2014). Together, they provide the revenues that support our charitable activities, enabling us to continue investing in science.  We thank and acknowledge the hard work and dedication of every contributor to this process: the Editorial boards, Editors, Authors, Reviewers and our publisher, Oxford University Press (OUP) who together make this possible
  • We hold a biennial scientific congress – This event is hosted in different European locations and hosts some of the biggest names in microbiology, attracting around 2,000 participants.
  • We provide small research and meeting grants – We give out more than 250 grants worth over EUR 250,000 every year to members of our Member Societies
  • We recognize excellence by giving out awards – Our first awards program was set up in 1999. We now have 5 awards programs running, including the Måkåla-Cassell Award with the American Society of Microbiology (ASM).
  • We promote education and continuing professional development (CPD) – our Education Network runs sessions at our Congress and inspired the Professional Development section in FEMS Microbiology Letters.
  • We initiated and fund the European Academy Microbiology (EAM), a leadership group of around 150 eminent microbiology experts.
Featured article

The first virus isolates from Antarctic sea ice have complex infection patterns

Viruses are recognized as important actors in ocean ecology and biogeochemical cycles, but many details are not yet understood. The authors of this paper participated in a winter expedition to the Weddell Sea, Antarctica, to isolate viruses and to measure virus-like particle abundance (flow cytometry) in sea ice. They isolated 59 bacterial strains and the first four Antarctic sea-ice viruses known (PANV1, PANV2, OANV1 and OANV2), which grow in bacterial hosts belonging to the typical sea-ice genera Paraglaciecola and Octadecabacter.

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