Member Societies

Our Member Societies serve the microbiology community through providing resources, building capacity, and stimulating collaboration. By joining one of our Member Societies, you receive the benefits of the society you join and from FEMS:

  • an open invitation to participate in FEMS network teams and activities
  • eligibility to apply for FEMS grants
  • discounts off FEMS Congress registration fees
  • 25% discount on all OUP books – certain Dictionaries and other premium titles excluded

How to join

Looking to join a Member Society? Have a look at the Member Societies below and find out more about them, learn how you can join them or contact them.

Is your microbiological society not a member of FEMS and are you looking into joining FEMS as a society? Have a look at the the duties and benefits associated with FEMS membership here.

Corresponding FEMS Member Societies

Currently, we have one Corresponding Member Society. Please note that if you are a member of a Corresponding Member Society, you are partially eligible for FEMS membership benefits, as  described here.

country/region member
Europe European Culture Collections’ Organisation

 

 

 

Full FEMS Member Societies

Below table lists all FEMS Member Societies per country, per region (Czech Republic & Slovakia; Serbia & Montenegro; Region German-speaking), per Europe-wide society and per Global society.

country/region Member societies
Armenia Armenian Microbiological Association
Austria Austrian Association of Molecular Life Sciences and Biotechnology
Austria Austrian Society for Hygiene, Microbiology and Preventive Medicine
Belarus Belarussian Non-governmental Association of Microbiologists
Belgium Belgian Society for Microbiology
Bosnia-Herzegovina Microbiology Society of BiH
Bulgaria Bulgarian Society for Microbiology (Union of Scientists in Bulgaria)
Croatia Croatian Microbiological Society
Czech Republic & Slovakia Czechoslovak Society for Microbiology
Denmark Danish Microbiological Society
Estonia Estonian Society for Microbiology
Finland Finnish Biochemical, Biophysical, and Microbiological Society
France French Society for Microbiology
Germany German Society of Hygiene and Microbiology
Germany Association for General and Applied Microbiology
Region-German speaking Society for Virology
Global Society for Anaerobic Microbiology
Global International Biodeterioration and Biodegradation Society
Greece Greek Society of Microbiology
Greece Society of Mikrobiokosmos
Hungary Hungarian Society for Microbiology
Iceland Microbiological Society of Iceland
Israel Israel Society for Microbiology
Italy Italian Society for Virology
Italy Italian Society of General Microbiology and Microbial Biotechnologies
Italy Italian Society of Agro-Food and Microbial Biotechnologies
Italy Italian Association for Clinical Microbiology
Italy Italian Society of Microbiology
Latvia Latvian Society for Microbiology
Lithuania Lithuanian Microbiological Society
Luxembourg Luxembourg Society for Microbiology
Macedonia, Republic of Macedonian Microbiological Society
Moldova Society for Microbiology of Moldova
Netherlands, The Royal Netherlands Society for Microbiology
Norway Norwegian Society for Microbiology
Poland Polish Society of Microbiologists
Portugal Portuguese Society of Microbiology
Romania Romanian Society for Microbiology
Russia Interregional Russian Microbiological Society
Russia Interregional Association for Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Russia All-Russian Public Organization “National Academy of Mycology”
Serbia Serbian Society for Microbiology
Slovenia Slovenian Microbiological Society
Spain Spanish Society for Microbiology
Spain Spanish Society for Virology
Sweden Swedish Society for Microbiology
Switzerland Swiss Society for Microbiology
Turkey Turkish Microbiological Society
Ukraine Society of Microbiologists of Ukraine
United Kingdom and Ireland Microbiology Society
United Kingdom Society for Applied Microbiology
United Kingdom British Phycological Society
United Kingdom British Mycological Society

 

 

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