FEMS membership

FEMS Member Societies and Affiliated Organisations are organized according to the FEMS statutes. These societies and organisations may exert their rights, fulfil their duties, and claim their benefits as follows.

The membership application form may be downloaded as a Word document and sent to the FEMS Business Office.

Member Societies are societies with a main or partial interest in microbiology, their delegates vote.

  • Full Member: Full fee, eligible for benefits
  • Provisional Member: Partial fee, they remain members for a limited acquainting period decided by Council then they must decide whether to take up full membership or not, eligible for benefits.
  • Associate Member: Partial fee, partially for benefits

Affiliated Organisations are organisations such as enterprises, agencies, institutions. Their representatives can attend and speak at Council but cannot vote.

  • Corresponding Member: Fee, partially eligible for benefits upon payment.

On this general basis the duties and rights are further specified below:

Member Societies
Member Affiliate
Annual fees for Member Societies (Basis is
€1.40 per member of Member Society)
100% 20%
Annual fee for Affiliated Organisations (basis is specific agreement with Corresponding Member)
Taking part in all activities +
Research and Training Grants1 +
Meeting Organizer Grants1 +
Meeting Attendance Grants1 + +
Journal Membership Subscription Price + +
Voting right at Council2 +
Attend and speak at Council + +
Taking part in Working Groups +
Taking part in lobbying activities +
Entry to website pages with restricted access + +
Promotion via website/Circular +

Note 1: benefit is lost when membership fees are more than two years in arrears (minute CO5-32/5.3)
Note 2: voting rights may be removed when membership fees are more than two years in arrears (article 23)

The membership application form may be downloaded as a Word document and sent to the FEMS Business Office.

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