FEMS-ASM Mäkelä-Cassell Travel Award for Early Career Scientists

The FEMS-ASM Award supports the reciprocal exchange of one member from each organization to present his/her research at the other organization’s main conference. It has been designed to benefit early career scientists from both organizations by giving them the opportunity to present their work overseas and experience the best of microbiology in the partner country.

ASM will select the member attending the biannual FEMS Congress and FEMS will select the member attending the ASM General Meeting occurring in intermittent years when no FEMS Congress is held.

These awards are to support travel and living costs of the grantee only.

FEMS Applicants

FEMS will select the member attending the ASM General Meeting occurring in 2020. Applicants should be microbiologists active in research and be current PhD (or equivalent) student or recipient of PhD within the past five years. They should be members of a FEMS Member Society.

Apply from 15 November 2019

ASM Applicants

ASM will select the member attending the FEMS Congress occurring in 2021. Applicants should be microbiologists active in research and be current PhD (or equivalent) student or recipient of PhD within the past five years. They should be members of ASM.

 

Past Winners of the Mäkelä-Cassell Awards

 

2019

FEMS-ASM Mäkelä-Cassell Award Awardee | Valerie de Anda, Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Texas at Austin, USA

 

2018

ASM-FEMS Mäkelä-Cassell Award Awardee | Mohd Zulkifli Salleh, Graduate Teaching Assistant at University of Manchester, UK

 

2017

FEMS-ASM Mäkelä-Cassell Award Awardee | Kana Morinaga

 

2016

ASM-FEMS Mäkelä-Cassell Award Awardee | Ajijur Rahman

 

2015

FEMS-ASM Mäkelä-Cassell Award Awardee | Ember Morrissey

 

2014

ASM-FEMS Mäkelä-Cassell Award Awardee | Francesca Turroni

 

2013

FEMS-ASM Mäkelä-Cassell Award Awardee | Clayton Caswell

 

 

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