GRANTS

FEMS Grants overview
Click on the image for a full overview of the FEMS Grants

Members of FEMS Member Societies can apply for research grants and/or support when organizing or attending a meeting – including our Member Societies’ national and regional congresses. Every year we support meeting organizers and early career researchers and enable experts to share ideas and promote excellence in science.

Our 2015-2019 strategic framework extends our definition of microbiology research to include Member microbiologists in education, policy, business and scientific communication. Further information about the grant opportunities we provide, including application deadlines, can be found on the following pages:Research and Training GrantMeeting Organizer GrantMeeting Attendance Grant and Congress Attendance Grant.

APPLY FOR A GRANT

To submit a grant application, please apply via FEMS Grants Online. The summary above outlines the information on eligibility. Links to the documents required to support your application are below.  

DOCUMENTS

When applying for a FEMS Grant, please see the Grants Regulations. During the application process, we will ask you to complete and upload supporting documents. You can find all of these templates in the table below.

all grants
Grants Regulations

 

 

 

RESEARCH & TRAINING GRANTS meeting organizer grants Meeting attendance grants CONGRESS ATTENDANCE GRANTS
Project Proposal Application Form Supervisor Endorsement Supervisor Endorsement
Supervisor Endorsement Budget
Endorsement Form
Early Career Scientist Meeting Grant Application Form

 

 

 

Featured article

Strategies to combat antimicrobial resistance: anti-plasmid and plasmid curing

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global problem hindering treatment of bacterial infections, rendering many aspects of modern medicine less effective. AMR genes (ARGs) are frequently located on plasmids, which are self-replicating elements of DNA. They are often transmissible between bacteria, and some have spread globally. Novel strategies to combat AMR are needed, and plasmid curing and anti-plasmid approaches could reduce ARG prevalence, and sensitise bacteria to antibiotics. Currently, there is a general lack of in vivo curing options. This review highlights this important shortfall, which if filled could provide a promising mechanism to reduce ARG prevalence in humans and animals. Plasmid curing mechanisms which are not suitable for in vivo use could still prove important for reducing the global burden of AMR, as high levels of ARGs exist in the environment.

read more
More articles
more articles