FEMS-Lwoff Award

Do you know anyone – either an individual or a group – that has provided outstanding service to microbiology in Europe?  Have they done something that deserves recognition? Then why not nominate them for the FEMS-Lwoff Award? Winners receive:

  • Professor André M. Lwoff (1902-1994)a prize-lecture at the opening ceremony of FEMS 2019 – with up to five free registrations to the FEMS Congress
  • the opportunity to present research to the wider microbiology community via the FEMS Journals and FEMS communication channels
  • a commemorative silver medal
  • an honorarium of €1.000

Everyone in the field of microbiology (societies, groups, or individuals) may nominate a Lwoff Award candidate to be presented at the 2021 Congress before 10 of March 2020.

About the Lwoff Award

Launched in 2000, this award aims award those that create high quality knowledge that helps solving today’s societal problems around microbiology. It was named in honour of the 1st FEMS President (1974-1976), Professor André M. Lwoff.

Making a nomination

Additional information about the selection procedure can be found in the regulations and nomination details.

You can send your nomination, including the requested information to fems@fems-microbiology.org  using the header: Lwoff Award nomination.

 

FEMS-Lwoff awardees

FEMS-Lwoff Awardee 2017

Jeff Errington, FEMS-Lwoff Awardee 2017Prof. J. Errington, United Kingdom
Prize Lecture: Cell wall deficient (L-form) bacteria: from chronic infections to the origins of life
Venue: Valencia, Spain, 7th FEMS Congress

FEMS-Lwoff Awardee 2019

Prof. P. Cossart, France
Prize Lecture: The model organism Listeria monocytogenes: towards the complete understanding of it physiology and its virulence
Venue: Glasgow, Scotland, 8th FEMS Congress

FEMS-Lwoff Awardees 2015

Fernando-BaqueroProf. F. Baquero, Spain
Prize Lecture: Transmission: a basic process in Microbiology
Venue: Maastricht, The Netherlands, 6th FEMS Congress
Date: 11 June 2015

Professor R.K. ThauerProf R.K. Thauer, Germany
Prize Lecture: The microbial methane cycle
Venue: Maastricht, The Netherlands, 6th FEMS Congress
Date: 11 June 2015

FEMS-Lwoff Awardee 2013

Professor J.L. RamosProf. Juan Luis Ramos, Granada
Prize Lecture: Mechanism of Solvent Tolerance in Gram Negative Bacteria
Venue: Leipzig, Germany, 5th FEMS Congress
Date: 25 July 2013

FEMS-Lwoff Awardee 2011

Miroslav Radman, Croatia
Venue: Geneva, Switzerland, 4th FEMS Congress
Date: 30 June 2011

 

FEMS-Lwoff Awardee 2009

K-H. SchleiferKarl-Heinz Schleifer, Germany
Prize Lecture:  Classification of Bacteria: From Unicellular Plants to the Age of Genomics
Venue: Gothenburg, Sweden, at the occasion of the 3rd FEMS Congress
Date: 1 July 2009

FEMS-Lwoff Awardee 2006

J. HackerJorg Hacker, Germany
Prize Lecture:  Evolution in Microbial Pathogens
Venue: Madrid, Spain, at the occasion of the 2nd FEMS Congress
Date: 6 July 2006

FEMS-Lwoff Awardee 2003

HopwoodCroppedWeb_030609Prof. Sir David A. Hopwood, United Kingdom
Prize Lecture:  Streptomyces Genes in Nature and Medicine
Venue: Ljubljana, Slovenia, at the occasion of the 1st FEMS Congress
Date: 2 July 2003

FEMS-Lwoff Awardee 2000

000228-1aWeb_SansonettiProf. Philippe J. Sansonetti, France
Prize Lecture:  Rupture, invasion and inflammatory destruction of the intestinal barrier by Shigella, making sense of prokaryote-eukaryote cross-talks.
Venue: Sevilla, Spain, at the occasion of the FEMS Jubilee
Date: 15 September 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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